Palliative Care

Palliative Care FAQ

Palliative care is a service that focuses on symptom management, comfort, and quality of life for individuals with chronic injury, illness, or disease such as stroke, heart failure, or cancer. Individuals can qualify to receive the care at the time of diagnosis and during curative care efforts. The focus is on providing comfort for the time being rather than prolonging life. An example of palliative care is pain and symptom management related to multiple sclerosis. Palliative care can be provided along with curative treatment.  Over time, however, if the doctor and/or the palliative care team believe that the treatment is no longer helping, the doctor may recommend hospice.

The care is provided by an interdisciplinary team to provide medical, social, emotional, and practical support to the individual and his/her family. The team is made of palliative care specialist doctors and nurses, a social worker,a dietician, and a chaplain. all focusing on the quality of life of the individual. It is different from hospice in that they can continue receiving palliative care indefinitely, as long as the individual qualifies for the need.

Palliative care’s existence evolved in the belief that with appropriate care and promotion of combined caring with a supportive community, patients and family/caregivers alike may experience improved quality of life.

When a patient is diagnosed with a life-threatening illness and would like to continue curative medical treatments, palliative care is available as an option for care. While the primary goal of palliative care is to provide pain and symptom relief for the individual, it’s scope goes beyond to provide the necessary support and guidance to family and caregivers.

Hospice is covered by most major insurers, including Medicare Including, Medicare, Medicaid, Medi-Cal, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, HMO, and other private insurers. When your insurance does not cover hospice care, discuss your options with Care Dimensions Healthcare.

No patient is ever turned away, regardless of their insurance or financial situation. Please contact us to find out what your options are and for details on what can be covered. Most times, there are no costs to the patient to receive palliative care though we still recommend that you contact your insurance company to find out about any possible copays.

The following services are included with Palliative care:

  • Pain and symptom management by palliative doctors and nurses.
  • Care coordination with your current physicians and anyone part of your plan of care.
  • Spiritual care, if requested by you and your family.
  • Provides care with the goal of helping you stay at home during a serious illness.

We also assist with placement, checking and assisting in filling out insurance coverage, and developing a plan of care specific to you and your family’s needs.

Palliative care is provided by an interdisciplinary team that includes: doctors, nurses, social workers, chaplains, dieticians, home health aides, volunteers, and others.

Most palliative care is provided in the home setting, this may be the patient’s home, family home or caregivers home; but it may also be provided in a short-term hospital stay or a clinic.

Both hospice and palliative care provides comfort and pain relief for a serious illness, as well as provide the necessary support and guidance family and caregivers need to cope with the difficulties caring for a patient with a life-limiting illness. The main difference is that a palliative patient may receive palliative care at any stage of their disease process while continuing to receive curative treatment.

Hospice and palliative care are partly similar in that both services require a full care team to provide a holistic approach to care, with the ultimate goal of providing symptom relief, comfort, and quality of life to patients. The main difference is that palliative care patients can continue to receive aggressive and curative treatment like chemotherapy, radiation, dialysis and surgery at the same time they receive palliative care while hospice care patients may not.

On the other hand, hospice patients need a physician to certify that they each have a terminal diagnosis and a life-expectancy of six-months or less whereas a palliative patient may receive palliative care at any stage of their disease process while continuing to receive curative treatment.

The table below shows the differences between Home Health, Hospice, and Palliative Care:

Hospice vs Palliative

Palliative care is a service that focuses on symptom management, comfort, and quality of life for individuals with chronic injury, illness, or disease such as stroke, heart failure, or cancer. Individuals can qualify to receive the care at the time of diagnosis and during curative care efforts. The focus is on providing comfort for the time being rather than prolonging life. An example of palliative care is pain and symptom management related to multiple sclerosis. Palliative care can be provided along with curative treatment.  Over time, however, if the doctor and/or the palliative care team believe that the treatment is no longer helping, the doctor may recommend hospice.


The care is provided by an interdisciplinary team to provide medical, social, emotional, and practical support to the individual and his/her family. The team is made of palliative care specialist doctors and nurses, a social worker,a dietician, and a chaplain. all focusing on the quality of life of the individual. It is different from hospice in that they can continue receiving palliative care indefinitely, as long as the individual qualifies for the need.


Palliative care’s existence evolved in the belief that with appropriate care and promotion of combined caring with a supportive community, patients and family/caregivers alike may experience improved quality of life.

When a patient is diagnosed with a life-threatening illness and would like to continue curative medical treatments, palliative care is available as an option for care. While the primary goal of palliative care is to provide pain and symptom relief for the individual, it’s scope goes beyond to provide the necessary support and guidance to family and caregivers.

Hospice is covered by most major insurers, including Medicare Including, Medicare, Medicaid, Medi-Cal, Blue Cross, Blue Shield, HMO, and other private insurers. When your insurance does not cover hospice care, discuss your options with Care Dimensions Healthcare.


No patient is ever turned away, regardless of their insurance or financial situation. Please contact us to find out what your options are and for details on what can be covered. Most times, there are no costs to the patient to receive palliative care though we still recommend that you contact your insurance company to find out about any possible copays.

The following services are included with Palliative care:


  • Pain and symptom management by palliative doctors and nurses.
  • Care coordination with your current physicians and anyone part of your plan of care.
  • Spiritual care, if requested by you and your family.
  • Provides care with the goal of helping you stay at home during a serious illness.

We also assist with placement, checking and assisting in filling out insurance coverage, and developing a plan of care specific to you and your family’s needs.

Palliative care is provided by an interdisciplinary team that includes: doctors, nurses, social workers, chaplains, dieticians, home health aides, volunteers, and others.

Most palliative care is provided in the home setting, this may be the patient’s home, family home or caregivers home; but it may also be provided in a short-term hospital stay or a clinic.

Both hospice and palliative care provides comfort and pain relief for a serious illness, as well as provide the necessary support and guidance family and caregivers need to cope with the difficulties caring for a patient with a life-limiting illness. The main difference is that a palliative patient may receive palliative care at any stage of their disease process while continuing to receive curative treatment.

Hospice vs. Palliative Care

Hospice and palliative care are partly similar in that both services require a full care team to provide a holistic approach to care, with the ultimate goal of providing symptom relief, comfort, and quality of life to patients. The main difference is that palliative care patients can continue to receive aggressive and curative treatment like chemotherapy, radiation, dialysis and surgery at the same time they receive palliative care while hospice care patients may not.

On the other hand, hospice patients need a physician to certify that they each have a terminal diagnosis and a life-expectancy of six-months or less whereas a palliative patient may receive palliative care at any stage of their disease process while continuing to receive curative treatment.

The table below shows the differences between Home Health, Hospice, and Palliative Care:

Home Health Care

Hospice Care

Palliative Care

Doctor’s order required to qualify?

Yes

Yes

Yes

Stage of illness

Chronic Illness

Terminal illness

Chronic or life-limiting illness

Can curative treatment continue?

Yes

No

Yes

Does the patient only have 6 months or less to live?

No

Yes

No

How soon does a patient get seen after a referral is made?

Within 48 hours, mostly the same day.

Within 48 hours, mostly the same day.

Within 5 days.

Can home health also service a patient at the same time?

-

No

Yes

Are medications included?

Yes, if related to illness

Yes, if related to illness

No

Who pays?

Medicare Part A or B, Medicare and most insurance

Medicare Part A and most insurance

Medicare Part B and most insurance

How frequently does the patient get seen by a nurse?

1 – 2 times per week by nurse

1 – 2 times per week by nurse

1 – 2 times per month by a nurse

Does it include a home health aide visit?

Yes

Yes

No

Location of care

At home or facility

At home or facility

At home, facility or hospital

Fill in your details and we’ll get back to you in no time.